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Sexuality, Citizenship and Youth – WA workshop

In partnership with the Australia Forum on Sexuality, Education and Health (AFSEH) and the WA Sexual Health and Blood-borne Virus Applied Research and Evaluation Network (SiREN), we are pleased to invite you to our second Western Australian workshop event. Join us for a late afternoon tea followed by a fun and stimulating discussion with speakers from across WA and Australia!

This event, which will take place at Shenton Park, is targeted at health and education professionals, teachers, researchers, policy makers and community leaders who are working to fuel progress in the fields of sexuality, education and health. The workshop will be an opportunity to gain insights into these issues and more; expand your professional development, and network with like-minded professionals.

The workshop will commence at 5pm for food and networking, followed by presentations commencing at 5.45pm.

Presenters:

Peter Aggleton (UNSW Sydney).

Roanna Lobo (Curtin University; SiREN).

Rob Cover (University of Western Australia).

Mary Lou Rasmussen (Australian National University) – Changing LGBTQ Youth Social Policy since 1990.

Kai Schweizer (Peer educator, Youth Affairs Council of WA) – Trans representation in the contemporary Western media.

Daniel Marshall (Deakin University) – Archives and the representation of queer young people.

Leigh Hill (editor, Out in Perth) – Role of LGBTQ community media for young people.

Renee Newman (WAAPA) – Filmmaker and director of film It’s Not Just Me, Renee will be discussing and introducing the film with focus on young people’s gender transition experiences in Western Australia.

Sam Winter (Curtin University) – Discussant.

To RSVP or for more information please email siren@curtin.edu.au.

Please RSVP by 1 December for catering purposes

Youth, Health & Practical Justice Conference, UTS, 4-5 Dec, – submit your abstracts!

Join us for the first national interdisciplinary conference for those working to promote young people’s wellbeing and health in education, health service, community, and youth work settings.

Youth, Health and Practical Justice is hosted by the UNSW Practical Justice Initiative and the UTS Faculty of Health explore themes of inclusion and participation, equity, assets and responses, and justice and social exclusion. For information on submission of abstracts and conference registration see: https://pjiconference.arts.unsw.edu.au/

We invite contributions of the following topics:

  • Understanding young people and health
  • Health and wellbeing of recent migrants and refugees
  • Digital cultures and youth
  • Communities, parents and young people’s health
  • Health promotion for youth: methods and approaches
  • Indigenous youth: priorities and perspectives
  • Youth-led initiatives: local and international experiences
  • Sexuality, education and health
  • Putting justice and rights centre stage
  • Popular pedagogy and informal education
  • Critical perspectives on drugs, alcohol and risk

The Youth, Health and Practical Justice Conference is organised by the Practical Justice Initiative at UNSW Australia and the Faculty of Health at UTS, Sydney. We acknowledge the support of Sexualities and Genders Research within the School of Social Sciences and Psychology at Western Sydney University, and the School of Education and Centre for Educational Research at Western Sydney University.

Academic employment: Principal Research Fellows, Melbourne

Academic AFSEH members may be interested in two new positions at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (Latrobe University), both closing on Sunday 18th September.
Both are research-only positions for 5 years at Academic Level D with responsibility for the development of key areas of established and emerging research excellence identified in the Centre’s Strategic Plan. Please feel free to circulate this information widely through your networks, and particularly to anyone you know who might be interested in applying. Application details below:
 
1. Associate Professor/Principal Research Fellow
This position has primary responsibility for leading the development of internationally recognised research programs in sexuality research with a focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) communities; health and human rights; qualitative research methodologies; and theoretical fields related to sexuality, gender, health and policy.
 
2. Associate Professor/Principal Research Fellow
The primary responsibility for this position will be to lead the development of internationally recognised research programs focusing on young people’s sexual health and sexuality education.

 

Save the Date: Sexuality, Citizenship and Youth workshop, 8 June, WA

In partnership with the Australia Forum on Sexuality, Education and Health (AFSEH) and the WA Sexual Health and Blood-borne Virus Applied Research and Evaluation Network (SiREN), we are pleased to invite you to a free pre-SiREN symposium workshop event. 

Join us for afternoon tea followed by a fun and stimulating discussion with speakers from across WA and Australia!

Peter Aggleton from UNSW Australia will talk about the importance of sexual
citizenship for all young people.

Rob Cover from UWA will talk on emergent sexual diversities in and on social
networking sites, and their potential to help young people learn about sex, sexuality and
relationships.

Dani Wright Toussaint from the Freedom Centre youth program will talk about LGBTIQ youth support – contemporary conditions and programs.

Kyra Clarke from UWA will talk about her recent work on teenage film and television.

Olivia Knowles from Safe Schools Coalition WA will talk about the work schools are
doing to become safer places, as well as the continuing need to create inclusive
environments for all in schools.

This event, which will take place at Shenton Park, is targeted at health and education
professionals, teachers, researchers, policy makers and community leaders who are working to fuel progress in the fields of sexuality, education and health.

To gain insights into these issues and more; expand your professional development and network with like-minded professionals, register here your interest in attending the seminar, which will take place 8 June 2016, 4:00-6:30pm.

Will you feed me?

Absolutely! We will begin this workshop with a 30 minute afternoon tea and networking session. Short presentations will begin promptly at 4.30pm.

We will write to you with full details of the event. Places are limited so an early response is much
appreciated.

How do sexuality/gender diverse students experience schooling?

FrontPage_report

Design and Aims

This report details the findings from a 2013 nationwide survey of sexuality and gender diverse Australian secondary school students.

The project’s core aims were to 1) gain a better understanding of how sexuality and gender diverse students experience their school’s ethos, referred to here as school climate, with regards to sexuality and gender diversity in the broad sense, and to 2) investigate links between students’ reported school climate and various measures of their school wellbeing and associated academic outcomes.

Demographics

Seven hundred and four young people between the ages of 14-18, representing every state and territory in Australia, participated in the online survey. In terms of sexual identity, the majority of participants identified as lesbian/gay (43%) or bisexual (24%), with a sizeable minority of participants identifying as pansexual (12%).

The majority of participants identified as either a girl/woman (57%) or as a boy/man (34%), with just over 7% of participants identifying as either genderqueer or transgender. The term sexuality and gender diverse is used throughout this report to signify the array of sexuality and gender identities highlighted by the young people.

Schooling Experiences

The young people in this study attended schools from across the sector, with the majority of participants attending government schools (62%). Participants overwhelmingly depicted a secondary schooling environment in which marginalising (e.g. homophobic/transphobic) language was rife and where school staff did not respond with consistency.

A startling 94% of students had heard homophobic language at school, with 58% of these young people reporting hearing this language daily. Of those who reported classmates using this language within earshot of school staff, less than 5% reported that these adults always intervened to put a stop to its use.

Although somewhat less commonly reported, 45% of participants indicated that they had witnessed school-based physical harassment of classmates perceived to be sexuality and/or gender diverse, with 12% of participants witnessing such harassment on a weekly basis. Only 12% of young people who witnessed such physical harassment occurring in front of school staff reported that these adults always intervened.

Participants depicted inconsistencies in adults’ responses to school-based marginalisation ranging from purposive ignoring (and, in the worst cases, active participation in the marginalising behaviours) to addressing the discrimination and attempting to educate around the incident. Most participants who described an educative intervention highlighted specific teachers at their school who would respond in such a manner, in contrast to a majority of others who would not.

Approximately 40% of students reported that they knew where to go to locate information and support regarding sexuality and gender diversity and similar percentages of students could recall their teachers engaging with sexuality and/or gender diversity in a positive or supportive fashion at least “some of the time” or more frequently. However, only one quarter of participants’ could recall classroom learning about topics related to sexuality and/or gender diversity in any kind of formal capacity, with a mere 3% of students reporting that it was “definitely true” that they had learned about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender identities during their Health and Physical Education instruction.

Findings suggest that some school staff work intentionally to support sexuality and gender diverse students in a variety of informal ways, including general positivity with regards to related topics and the provision of inclusive resources, but that formal curricular inclusion is far less common.

Participants attending schools in which their school harassment policies explicitly included sexual orientation as a considered and protected cohort of the student population (16% of participants) were significantly more likely to report their teachers’ intervention in instances of verbal and physical marginalisation of sexuality and gender diverse students, as well as their general positivity and support.

Relationships between School Climate and School Wellbeing

Students attending schools with fewer instances of marginalising behaviours, and more consistent adult intervention when those behaviours did occur, were happier and more connected at school, safer and more likely to feel as if their teachers were invested in their personal academic success.

Likewise, reported teacher positivity and support for both sexuality diversity and gender diversity were significantly correlated with students’ school wellbeing outcomes, with the strongest relationships present between teacher positivity and both student morale and sense of connection to school. Similar relationships were found between school wellbeing outcomes and students’ reported formal inclusions (e.g. within health and physical education and elsewhere within the curriculum).

Academic Outcomes

Participants with elevated school wellbeing outcomes also had higher reported academic outcomes, including higher academic self-concept, greater intentions to attend university and fewer reported incidences of truancy. Students’ truancy behaviours were significantly correlated with their teachers’ reported positivity with regards to sexuality and gender diversity, highlighting the links between school climate, school wellbeing and academic outcomes and behaviours for sexuality and gender diverse students.

Conclusions

Most of the sexuality and gender diverse young people who contributed to this research attended secondary schools in which marginalising practices occurred on a weekly, if not daily, basis and where teacher positivity and formal inclusions of sexuality and gender diversity were the exception rather than the norm. Project findings highlight the relationship between sexuality and gender diverse students’ perceptions of their school climate and their own school wellbeing, including connection to their peers, teachers and investment in the schooling environment more generally, and demonstrate how these key factors are linked to academic outcomes for this cohort.

Project-based recommendations can be found within the body of the report: http://handle.uws.edu.au:8081/1959.7/uws:32727

Young people, sexuality and diversity – evidence, entitlement and effectiveness

Simon Blake on Young people, sexuality and diversity – evidence, entitlement and effectiveness
When: 25 Nov 2015, 12:30pm – 1:30pm
Venue: CSRH, Level 2 John Goodsell Building, UNSW Kensington
Who: Simon Blake, Chief Executive of the National Union of Students in the UK
Simon Blake

This seminar will look at the way rights, values and evidence can come together to provide all young people with education and support that enables children and young people to develop the confidence, skills and knowledge to manage their relationships, choices and sexual lives as they move through puberty, adolescence and into adulthood.

Simon Blake OBE is Chief Executive of the National Union of Students in the UK, a confederation of 600 Students’ Unions. He is Deputy Chair of Stonewall, the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender charity. Until May this year, all of Simon’s work had been solely focused on sex and relationships education, sexual health and well being for over 20 years. He was Chief Executive of Brook, the young people’s sexual health charity and Sex Education Forum.

To register: https://csrh.arts.unsw.edu.au/event/young-people-sexuality-and-diversity-evidence-entitlement-and-effectiveness/