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Social Media, Sexual Citizenship and Youth Research showcase and panel discussion: Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne

When: Tuesday 10 April, 6-8pm

Where: Room TD144, TD Building, John Street (five minutes from Glenferrie Station)

Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn

Free event showcasing young Melbourne researchers and social media communication professionals alongside researchers from the ARC Discovery project Queer Generations: Belonging and sexual citizenship among gender and sexual minority youth (https://queergenerations.org/).

We  welcome  health and education professionals, teachers, researchers, policy makers and community leaders who are working to fuel progress in the fields of sexuality, education and health

Confirmed presenters include:

Kath Albury (Swinburne University of Technology) on

Queer young people’s negotiation of safety, risk and visibility in hookup app cultures

Charlie Chapple (Swinburne University of Technology) on

Closed Facebook communities as peer support for trans and non-binary young people

Daniel Marshall and Ben Hegarty (Deakin University) on

Minus 18: a case-study in histories of queer youth uses of communication technologies

Jonathan Mavroudis (Swinburne University of Technology) on

Shirtless selfies and young gay men’s identity formation practices

Ivy McGowan (Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, Latrobe University) on

Targeting (successful) research recruitment: Lessons from LGBTIQ digital activist cultures

Panel discussion (including presenters and members of the Queer Generations team):

Reflections on sexual citizenship and the emergent relationship between growing up queer and contemporary media practices

This event is presented by Swinburne University of Technology Social Media Research Group, Family Planning Victoria, the Queer Generations research project and the Australia Forum for Sexuality, Education and Health (AFSEH).

Please RSVP here.

Further information please contact Tinonee Pym: tpym@swin.edu.au

Image credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/celesteh/

Professional Development Programs for Effective Sexuality and Relationships Education – WA

Curtin University provides an extensive range of training programs in the area of school‐based sexuality and relationships education (SRE). We offer training opportunities for both pre‐service and in‐service teachers, and strive to provide all our attendees with ongoing support. Our programs are also suitable for school administrators and community health nurses who work in schools.

Additional events will be scheduled throughout the year, so please email jacqui.hendriks@curtin.edu.au if you wish to join our mailing list.

Please contact us if you are interested in enrolling in any of our undergraduate or postgraduate units dedicated to school‐based SRE. Students from other WA universities may be eligible to enrol.

2016 Calendar of Events

Visit www.sreteacherproject.eventbrite.com.au for more information and to register

(Registrations open a few months prior to each event)

17th & 18th March 2016 All day SRE Professional Development Workshop (2 days)
31st March 2016 4‐6pm Seminar

Pornography and young people

7th June 2016 4‐6pm Seminar

Innovative ways to teach respectful relationships

30th September 4‐6pm Seminar

Cyber safety, sexuality and young people

12th November 4‐6pm Seminar

Supporting male teachers who deliver SRE

Planning to discuss the Essena O’Neill story with young people? Read this first…

 

Social Media Dress

(illustration credit: Anthony Stone)

 

Western Australian academic Crystal Abidin recently completed an ethnographic study of social media ‘influencers’. Her research tells us that the Essena O’Neill story is about A LOT more than the dangers of social media.

This blog post (and others on Crystal’s blog) offers an overview on mainstream media coverage of O’Neill’s story, and suggests  some ways to think about and discuss it, without blaming, or shaming young people’s social media practices. As Abidin provocatively puts it:

Dwelling on the micro-public actions of one 18-year-old (without taking into account nuances like her demographic, context, backstory, motivations, etc) and casting a blanket statement that WE NEED TO SAVE YOUNG PEOPLE or that YOUNG PEOPLE ARE NARCISSISTIC is

1) shallow albeit clickbaity,

2) prescriptive and not descriptive, and

3) just not productive. What is the value of another article describing how O’Neill cried through her video?

AFSEH members Kath Albury and Paul Byron have been conducting research into the ways that Australian sexuality educators and health promotion professionals engage with young people’s digital and mobile media practices. They will be launching their initial report on this project at the AFSEH National Conference at the University of Western Sydney in late November. You can check out a draft program here, and register for the conference here.